Broke Book Girl Wish List: Episode 3

The Broke Book Girl Wish List is a list of books I can't wait to read. These are the books I cross my fingers hoping to find at the thrift store, or, at the very least, pester booksellers by trying to find out when they'll be issued in paperback. 

The reason Gabriel Garcia Marquez is my favorite author is because all of his books make me understand love in a way I have never understood it before. (Don't worry, there'll be a separate post on that.) So this week's Broke Book Girl Wish List focuses on other books that present love in unique ways--because, well, tradition is overrated. 

Artsy cover, intriguing title... What's not to love already?

Artsy cover, intriguing title... What's not to love already?

Synopsis from GoodreadsLike a jewel shimmering in a Midwest skyline, the Toledo Institute of Astronomy is the nation's premier center of astronomical discovery and a beacon of scientific learning for astronomers far and wide. Here, dreamy cosmologist George Dermont mines the stars to prove the existence of God. Here, Irene Sparks, an unsentimental scientist, creates black holes in captivity.

George and Irene are on a collision course with love, destiny and fate. They have everything in common: both are ambitious, both passionate about science, both lonely and yearning for connection. The air seems to hum when they’re together. But George and Irene’s attraction was not written in the stars. In fact their mothers, friends since childhood, raised them separately to become each other's soulmates. 
When that long-secret plan triggers unintended consequences, the two astronomers must discover the truth about their destinies, and unravel the mystery of what Toledo holds for them—together or, perhaps, apart.

Lydia Netzer's How to Tell Toledo from the Night Sky combines a gift for character and big-hearted storytelling, with a sure hand for science and a vision of a city transformed by its unique celestial position, exploring the conflicts of fate and determinism, and asking how much of life is under our control and what is pre-ordained in the heavens. 

I don't often see books set in the Caribbean in the 1900s, so OF COURSE I'm intrigued!

I don't often see books set in the Caribbean in the 1900s, so OF COURSE I'm intrigued!

Synopsis from Goodreads: A major debut from an award-winning writer—an epic family saga set against the magic and the rhythms of the Virgin Islands.

In the early 1900s, the Virgin Islands are transferred from Danish to American rule, and an important ship sinks into the Caribbean Sea. Orphaned by the shipwreck are two sisters and their half brother, now faced with an uncertain identity and future. Each of them is unusually beautiful, and each is in possession of a particular magic that will either sink or save them.

Chronicling three generations of an island family from 1916 to the 1970s, Land of Love and Drowning is a novel of love and magic, set against the emergence of Saint Thomas into the modern world. Uniquely imagined, with echoes of Toni Morrison, Gabriel García Márquez, and the author’s own Caribbean family history, the story is told in a language and rhythm that evoke an entire world and way of life and love. Following the Bradshaw family through sixty years of fathers and daughters, mothers and sons, love affairs, curses, magical gifts, loyalties, births, deaths, and triumphs, Land of Love and Drowning is a gorgeous, vibrant debut by an exciting, prizewinning young writer.

The description actually reminds me a lot of Tell The Wolves I'm Home by Carol Rifka Brunt. Since I'm an only child, I'm fascinated by sisterly relationships. 

The description actually reminds me a lot of Tell The Wolves I'm Home by Carol Rifka Brunt. Since I'm an only child, I'm fascinated by sisterly relationships. 

Synopsis from GoodreadsSisters Natalie and Alice Kessler were close, until adolescence wrenched them apart. Natalie is headstrong, manipulative and beautiful; Alice is a dreamer who loves books and birds. During their family's summer holiday at the lake, Alice falls under the thrall of a struggling young painter, Thomas Bayber, in whom she finds a kindred spirit. Natalie, however, remains strangely unmoved, sitting for a family portrait with surprising indifference. But by the end of the summer, three lives are shattered.

Decades later, Bayber, now a reclusive, world-renowned artist, unveils a never-before-seen work, Kessler Sisters, a provocative painting depicting the young Thomas, Natalie, and Alice. Bayber asks Dennis Finch, an art history professor, and Stephen Jameson, an eccentric young art authenticator, to sell the painting for him. That task becomes more complicated when the artist requires that they first locate Natalie and Alice, who seem to have vanished. And Finch finds himself wondering why Thomas is suddenly so intent on resurrecting the past.

In The Gravity of Birds histories and memories refuse to stay buried; in the end only the excavation of the past will enable its survivors to love again.

 

 

What do you think? Will you be adding any of these to your To-Be-Read List? You can keep up with my reading adventures in real time by following me on Goodreads